North Carolina News

New report calls for NCDPI to make changes to improve effectiveness, efficiency

RALEIGH, N.C. (WNCN) - A new report called on the N.C. Department of Public Instruction to make a variety of changes aimed at improving its effectiveness and efficiency.

The firm Ernst & Young conducted the review, which cost $975,000. The researchers spent the last 12 weeks studying the department, getting feedback from more than 200 people within and outside the agency.

news-app-download-apple-350x50news-app-download-android-350x50

“Oh, this is definitely what I expected. I ran for this office to lead this agency to the positive transformations that we need to better support schools,” said State Superintendent of Public Instruction Mark Johnson (R).

In the report, Ernst & Young makes several findings. Among them:

  • “DPI’s effectiveness is limited by its tendency to work in siloes — an observation that extends to many functions, including how data is used, how policy is developed, how budgets are created, and others.”
  • “In addition, delays in the contracting process have become a critical issue for NC DPI management.”
  • “NC DPI appears to lack an overriding theory for how to support (local education agencies) and educators to drive student outcomes; individual offices develop their own support structures, professional development plans and assessments.”
  • “In addition, employee morale is widely perceived to be struggling amidst higher levels of turnover, fragmented communication, and uncertainty about the vision and future funding of the organization.” 

Ernst & Young found areas where the department could work more efficiently, such as information technology. The report also calls for the creation of a “transformation management office” to implement the 18 recommendations made to improve DPI.

Implementing the recommendations could cost about $4 million, and potentially result in saving more than $5 million over time. Members of the state Board of Education noted DPI’s budget is set to be cut by nearly 14 percent next year. 

“Well, I don’t think we should have to keep those cuts. We’ll be looking to the General Assembly to back off of those cuts,” said William Cobey, chairman of the State Board of Education.

Johnson said, “Well, I’m gonna go over and talk with the General Assembly. I have a good relationship with them, and we’re gonna talk about how if we postpone those cuts we can actually do it in a more systematic, strategic way.”

To read the report, click here.

WHAT OTHERS ARE CLICKING ON:

JOHNSTON COUNTY MOM KNEW OF SEXUAL CONDUCT BETWEEN TEEN AND CHEER COACH, OFFICIALS SAY

WOMAN ARRESTED AFTER DEFACING UNC'S 'SILENT SAM'

MORE WAKE COUNTY PARENTS COME FORWARD ABOUT EXPLICIT MESSAGES FROM INSTAGRAM IMPOSTORS

SUSPECTS APPEAR IN COURT AFTER DAD KILLED, MOM INJURED IN HOKE COUNTY SHOOTING

COMPROMISING PHOTOS OF WIFE LED TO KIDNAPPING, SHOOTING, NC MAN SAYS


More Stories

North Carolina News Headlines

Trending Stories

Latest News

Video Center