Debunking myths about the COVID-19 vaccine

Coronavirus

RALEIGH, N.C. (WNCN)– As news about the vaccine spreads, so do rumors about how it will affect you and word of mouth is spreading lots of false information about the vaccines. 

There’s a lot of doubt about the vaccine in the minds of millions of people, doubt that’s being sowed by social media.  

Here are four vaccine myths CBS 17 Consumer Investigator Steve Sbraccia is debunking with science.  

MYTH: THE VACCINE WILL TRACK YOU 

There’s a lie that the vaccine will be used to insert a microchip in you so you can be tracked. 

Yes, there are RF-ID chips about the size of a grain of rice, and yes, they are injected under your skin using a hypodermic needle. 

But, that chip is invasive enough you would notice it right away, and although it’s used in pets, its use in humans is uncommon and very limited. 

People also connect the bar code on the syringe with a tracking device, but the bar code is just used to make sure the vaccine is authentic and not expired.  

MYTH: THE VACCINE WILL ALTER YOUR GENETIC CODE 

Dr. Lisa Morici of Tulane University helps debunk this one. 

“We’re not getting injected with a virus,” she said. We are not getting injected with something that can intergrade into our DNA.” 

These are these first vaccines that don’t use live virus, but rather RNA to make them effective. 

People confuse RNA with DNA. 

DNA replicates and stores your genetic information. RNA uses genetic information to build proteins. 

Just like you can’t get orange juice from an apple, RNA and DNA are two different things. 

MYTH: THE VACCINE WILL MAKE YOU STERILE 

This horrendous myth originated from a post on social media from a blog called Health & Money News. 

The blogger just made up the claim saying the Pfizer vaccine contained ingredients to attack the placenta. 

The blog was pulled offline by its domain provider because of its false claims. 

The science from the Pfizer research related to that vaccine’s clinical trials shows no sterility or infertility as a side effect of their vaccine. 

These false claims floating around on social media frustrate medical professionals like Dr. Keith Ferdinand of Tulane University. He worries that it will convince people to avoid the vaccines for the virus. 

“I think it would be a travesty to turn our backs in thus opportunity to curtail is Covid-19 pandemic,” he said. 

MYTH: THE VACCINE WORKS IMMEDIATELY 

No it does not. 

Like any vaccine, it takes a while for your body to build up immunity. 

If it is a two-dose vaccine, research shows immunity kicks in seven days after the second dose. For a single shot, vaccine clinical trials show immunity develops after 14 days. 

Doctors say it doesn’t matter what vaccine you use. 

“People are asking me which vaccine should I take? said Morici.  “My answer, whichever one is available to you.” 

The World Health Organization estimates COVID-19 vaccines will prevent at least three million deaths in the first year of their use, so don’t put yourself at risk by believing some fraudulent myth on the internet. 

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