RALEIGH, N.C. (WNCN) — Did you get an emailed receipt for a new iPhone that you didn’t buy?

It could be a scam.

The North Carolina Better Business Bureau is warning people to be wary of a phishing scheme in which people who are told to contact a phony customer service number wind up being asked for their bank or credit card information.

Here’s how the scam works.

You get an email saying you bought an iPhone and your account — either bank, credit card, or Amazon — will be charged.

But because you didn’t buy that phone, you want to get the charge reversed, so you call the customer service phone number included in the email. The person who answers the phone says they can fix the problem but only if you act immediately.

The person on the phone might ask for credit card or bank information, saying it’s needed to cancel the sale. One person said a scammer asked them to download an app. 

The bureau says you should always double-check the sender’s email address for typos or other signs that it’s not legitimate. It also says to check your bank and credit card account for charges first — because if the charge they’re claiming hasn’t shown up, it’s probably a scam.

And you should never click on suspicious links, which could download malware to your device and make you vulnerable to identity theft.