New York considering a bill that would lower emergency sirens sounds

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NEW YORK (CBS NEWSPATH) – City Councilwoman Helen Rosenthal is spearheading a proposal to lower the frequency, not the decibel level of emergency sirens.

It’s a blaring sound most New Yorkers will say and they know the sound is important.

However, the sound borders on the line of painful and intrusive.

“You have so much infrastructure.  It’s really loud.,” said Aaron Stevulak of Manhattan.

Manhattan resident Patricia Roland says it’s very noisy and hard to sleep sometimes.

Soon the sirens of police cars, fire trucks, and ambulances that have echoed throughout the streets of New York for decades could soon be replaced by sounds similar to those heard in Europe.

New York City Councilwoman, Helen Rosenthal said, “Change the tone of their siren from one monotonous high pitch noise to a high low pattern.”

One hospital in New York has already made some changes.

Mount Sinai hospital has already adjusted some ambulances.

The hospital says it has received fewer noise complaints since they made the changes, while still maintaining the same level of urgency.

 
Ricardo Mendoza, EMS Assistant Director for Mount Sinai Health System, said, “I believe they are equally as safe, the decibels are not different, it is just a break in tone that I think people are reacting to, which make it seem like it is actually lower than it really is.”
 
Some New Yorkers say they’re so used to the old sirens, they may not know what’s going on if the city changes it.

Staten Island Resident, Malik Wichers said, “I can hear the New York sirens coming from a block away.”

But other residents say they’re ready for a new sound.
 
David Florence from Hells Kitchen in Manhattan, said: “You don’t need to have such an abusive amount of noise to tell you someone is coming.”

No matter what the sound the is, residents will still have to hurry up and move out the way.

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